Ever wanted to do more than just study at Uni? Want to learn some lawyerly skills? The competitions at TULS offer are a great way of learning and practicing new skills which will be valuable during your law degree as well as after graduation. We know it can be intimidating to try something new, but TULS has prepared an awesome handbook to give you all the essential information as well as answer any burning questions you may have about each competition.

Don’t forget to check the TULS noticeboard for signups and important information!

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Competitions at TULS

The Competitions Handbook is available for download here.

The definitive guide to TULS competitions including valuable information on:

The “National” Moot Competition

The Witness Examination Competition

The Negotiation Competition

The Client Interview Competition

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Mooting

If you don’t know what mooting is by now, it’s high time you found out! Mooting is a mock trial in front of judges (they may be actual judges, faculty staff, alumni etc) where the mooters present oral arguments to argue for a case. There are usually 4 people presenting (2 applicants and 2 respondents) and both sides will present arguments and take questions from the bench (judges).

Mooting is one of the most exciting things you can do at law school and one of the most useful skills to develop for a legal career.

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Negotiations

Want to negotiate the terms of a contract? Or strike a deal which is beneficial for all parties? The negotiation is the competition for you! This competition involves working in pairs against another team- where both parties are usually representing client in order to achieve some outcome. It requires quick thinking, forward planning and excellent strategy.

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Client Interviewing

If you want to work with people in the future and not robots then client interviewing may be a great place to start your competition career. Client interviewing is just that- interviewing clients at a ‘legal office’, they can be grumpy old men, distracted or bereaved individuals with little knowledge of the law.

During this competition you will be expected to discover the crux of the client’s legal issue, ask the relevant questions and present the client with well structured and logical advice. Some clients may need a little bit of a push to get information from them whilst others may divulge seemingly useless information; it is your job to discover the important bits.

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Witness examination

This is an evidence based competition which will see competitors grill witnesses for both side (in-chief and cross examine). As well as examining witnesses you will give an opening and closing address to present your clients case.  This competition requires quick thinking, a lot of spunk and confidence.

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ALSA conference (Australian Law students Association)

So you have probably heard this term ALSA being thrown around, it’s the Australian Law Students Association conference and it happens every year at a different uni around Australia. It is a week full of competitions, parties, meeting new people and hearing amazing lectures from inspirational legal professionals. There are two ways to get there;

  • if you are a 3rd, 4th or 5th year, secure your place by competing ALSA try outs. If successful you will be offered a place on the team and most of your expenses (registration and accommodation) will be covered or;
  •  You can come along as a general delegate, yes you will have to pay for yourself but it is worth it and many graduated name ALSA as the best thing they did during their law degree, open to all years and a great experience for all law students.

For more information see

http://alsaconference.com.au/ or  http://www.alsa.net.au/